Navigation
  • DE
  • EN
  • FR
Logo Max Ernst Museum Brühl des LVRLogo Landschaftsverband Rheinland

NANDO NKRUMAH – HEUTE SCHON MORGEN

Exhibition from June 21 until November 3, 2024



A portrait of the artist Alberto Giacometti.

Key Visual of "Alberto Giacometti – Unveiled Surrealism"

ALBERTO GIACOMETTI – UNVEILED SURREALISM

Exhibition from September 1, 2024 until January 15, 2025

In autumn 2024, the Max Ernst Museum Brühl of the LVR is dedicating a major exhibition to the surreal work of the Swiss sculptor, painter and illustrator Alberto Giacometti (1901-1966). Giacometti's work is one of the most independent contributions to modernist sculpture. Like Max Ernst, the sculptor was drawn to Paris in 1922, where they met in 1928 and worked in neighbouring studios. With his work La Boule suspendue, Giacometti was accepted into the circle of Surrealists in 1930. In his surrealist-influenced works, the sculptor explores the abysses of the unconscious with great inventiveness. The presentation shows Giacometti's lesser-known work of the 1920s and 1930s, which is characterised by the Surrealist movement in Paris, and for the first time also takes a look at his artistic and friendly relationship with Max Ernst. In addition to works from the surrealist phase, selected examples of his filigree bronze figures developed after 1945 will be on display, together with paintings, drawings and prints. The exhibition is being organised in exclusive collaboration with the Fondation Giacometti, Paris.

Subject to change!



a surreal creature with a burger face

Anne Horel, Burger Fern, 2024, Digital Collage

HYPERCREATURES

Exhibition from March until October 2025

Since the beginning of the 20th century at the latest, hybridisations of materials and motifs have been one of the defining processes in the visual arts. For his surrealist collages created from 1922 onwards, Max Ernst used scissors and a scalpel to dismantle images of human and non-human bodies and assemble them into new creatures.

The international group exhibition Hypercreatures at the Max Ernst Museum Brühl of the LVR sheds light on the significance of the fundamental image-making processes of surrealism for contemporary art. With a view to social changes or current developments in science and technology, around 20 contemporary artists are showing hybrid creatures that combine elements of humans, animals, machines and plants. These hyper-creatures stand for a new understanding of identity, difference and culture.

Subject to change!